Web Finds: Emeli Sande, Miranda July & More

Film
I haven’t watched any documentaries on here, but you might find something of interest.

Have you been paying attention to The rise of black lesbian and gay cinema?

Miranda July gives us an awesome tip for those of us who are easily distracted hehe (this is an outtake of The Future).

Literary
The Death of the Black Owned Independent Bookstore, from the AALBC Blog (on the right hand side of your screen, you should see a “Support Black Businesses” image; click it for AALBC’s database of Black owned indie bookstores)

I might as well put Teju Cole in charge of my reading list.  His comments on Michael Ondaatje got me to add Coming Through Slaughter and Running in the Family to my reading list:

For purposes of marketing, writers are designated as poets, novelists, or something else. But writing is about matchmaking, an attempt to marry sensations with apt words. Ondaatje makes language translucent – the exact word, the exact placement of a comma – and the reader has the uncanny feeling of encountering ideas directly. His work is about the things I care most about: memory, threshholds, solitude, work (usually the work of hands), dangerous loves, half-remembered songs and scars of all kinds. It is a particular constellation of thoughts and experiences, so particular to me, I sometimes feel, that I’m unsure if I’m reading or if I’m the one being read.

Other
The words of Emeli Sande are inspiration for any artists (h/t: Concreteloop)

Willful Creatures

Another detour from my summer of African literature.

I stan for Miranda July and according to Feminist Texican, If you like Aimee Bender then you may like Miranda July.  Banking on the converse also being true, I requested Bender’s Willful Creatures from the library.   A collection of 15 stories in 3 parts, Willful Creatures is a perfect mix of reflections on life and humor.  When I first started the collection, I wasn’t getting it, the first story, “Death Watch” was too weird for me.  By the third story, “Off”, I was a fan.  My favorites in the collection:

Off
An awkwardly arrogant woman attends a party.  She has one goal for the night: to kiss 3 men (one with blond hair, one with red hair, and one with black hair).  The shenanigans that occur in her pursuit are hilarious and pitiful.

The Meeting starts:

The woman he met. He met a woman. This woman was the woman he met. She was not the woman he expected to meet or planned to meet or had carved into his head in full dress with a particular nose and eyes and lips and a very particular brain.

*sigh*  When we meet someone who is unlike the image of our perfect partner and we decide to give it a try, are we settling or being more open?  “The Meeting” is not ambivalent in its response but I’m not convinced by the answer it leans towards.

Motherfucker
This is the story of a man who literally fucks mother.  Yeah, sounds crass I know but I loved how this story developed. He travels by train from the Midwest to Los Angeles, meeting women along the way.  When he lands in L.A., he meets a mother who is also a well-known actress.  She is so good at her profession, she sometimes doesn’t know when to not act.  And this is where the magic happens, he gets her to open up in a way that has nothing to do with sex.  I absolutely loved this story!

You can read excerpts here and you can purchase Willful Creatures at
Barnes & Noble
Powell’s
IndieBound
Amazon

On My Radar: Boneshaker

From the film’s site: Boneshaker follows a Ghanaian immigrant family taking a road trip to a Pentecostal church in Louisiana to cure their violent daughter. As the family journeys to a tent revival at the ends of the levee-less Louisiana delta, they discover the complications of trying to perform a traditional ritual away from home. Boneshaker focuses on the feelings of homelessness, landlessness, and rootlessness that accompany immigration.

More:
the video for the Kickstarter campaign that funded the film and
an interview with the director, Frances Bodomo.

I’m ready for this.

P.S. If you’re a Miranda July fan, check out this other short from Frances Bodomo:

The Future

The Future is about a couple, Jason and Sophie, who’ve been together for four years. Both are 35 and, whilst preparing to adopt a cat, realize that life is soon coming to an end. Thirty days before the cat, named Paw Paw, is to come home with Jason and Sophie, they quit their jobs and embrace the option of living more fulfilling lives.


Read More »